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PO Box 3929
Batesville, AR 72503
USA

(870) 834-4022

Based in Batesville, Arkansas, Pro Se Productions has become a leader on the cutting edge of New Pulp Fiction in a very short time.

Pulp Fiction, known by many names and identified as being action/adventure, fast paced, hero versus villain, over the top characters and tight, yet extravagant plots, is experiencing a resurgence like never before. And Pro Se Press, publishing New Pulp since August, 2011, is a major part of the revival, one of the reasons that New Pulp is growing by leaps and bounds!

Pro Se is the place to find Super Heroes, Explorers, Fairies, Werewolves, Men's Men, and Femme Fatales.  Specializing primarily in prose books, anthologies, and magazines, Pro Se has made a commitment to 'Put the Monthly Back into Pulp' and continues to do that successfully, producing at least one New Pulp work every month!  

Pro Se is an innovator in New Pulp, continually refining its presentation and product and working on exciting new veins of New Pulp to bring to readers and fans of all ages everywhere!

Chuck Miller-Author

CHUCK MILLER-AUTHOR 

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Chuck Miller was born in Ohio, lived in Alabama for many years, and now resides in Norman, Oklahoma, for reasons best left to the imagination. He is a Libra whose interests include monster movies, comic books, music and writing. He holds a BA in creative writing from the University of South Alabama. 

He is the creator/writer of TALES OF THE BLACK CENTIPEDE, THE INCREDIBLE ADVENTURES OF VIONNA VALIS AND MARY JANE KELLY, THE BAY PHANTOM CHRONICLES, and THE MYSTIC FILES OF DOCTOR UNKNOWN JUNIOR. He has also written stories featuring such classic characters as Jill Trent: Science Sleuth, Armless O'Neil, The Griffon, and others.

Miller received the BEST NEW WRITER OF 2011 Award from Pulp Ark. His first novel, the critically acclaimed "Creeping Dawn: The Rise of the Black Centipede" was published in 2011 by Pro Se Press. The second installment in the Black Centipede series, "Blood of the Centipede" was published in 2012. "Black Centipede Confidential" is slated for release in 2013. Also due in 2013 is "Vionna and the Vampires," the first installment of The Incredible Adventures of Vionna Valis and Mary Jane Kelly.

"The Black Centipede and related characters are part of a grand concept I came up with myself and started writing and publishing on the web," says Miller. They had actually been festering in my skull for more than 20 years-- a proposed comic book that never made it off the ground-- and it seemed about time to let them out."


The first volume in an epic tale of Heroes, Villains, Murder, and Madness. Follow the birth and growth of one of the strangest Characters in New Pulp Fiction to date, The Black Centipede as created by Chuck Miller!  Discover how a young man's fated encounter with the notorious and infamous Lizzie Borden gave Zenith City and the world the one hero strange enough to save them!  Read breathlessly as Miller weaves the Black Centipede in and out of History, bringing his unique hero into contact with Characters, both real and fictional! Described as 'Psychedelic Pulp', CREEPING DAWN: THE RISE OF THE BLACK CENTIPEDE is perhaps the wildest, trippiest ride in New Pulp today!


AT LAST THE UNTOLD STORY BEHIND ONE OF HOLLYWOOD'S LONG LOST CLASSICS CAN BE TOLD! AND PRO SE GETS TO BRING IT TO YOU! From The Casebook of the mysterious BLACK CENTIPEDE, the true story of his adventures in Hollywood while filming the 1930s classic BLOOD OF THE CENTIPEDE! Chuck Miller, hand picked biographer of the Black Centipede finally tells a tale that involves Amelia Earhart, William Randolph Hearst, 'Fatty' Arbuckle, and Los Angeles' own masked vigilante- The Blue Candiru- in an adventure stranger than anything that happened on the big screen! Plus, in the Centipede's own words, his first encounter with the enigmatic WHITE CENTIPEDE! With stunning cover art by David L. Russell and eye catching design and back cover art by Sean Ali, BLOOD OF THE CENTIPEDE is the second Centipede novel from the twisted mind of Chuck Miller! Psychedelic Pulp at its best! From Pro Se Press! Puttin' The Monthly Back Into Pulp!


The year is 1932. The place is Zenith, home of the mysterious Black Centipede. The sinister Professor James Moriarty comes calling, and he's brought a few friends with him: John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Ma Barker, Bonnie and Clyde, the Bell Witch, the Loch Ness Monster, and the rest of the deadly Order of the Sunless Circle. Moriarty is looking for Jack the Ripper's Analytical Engine, and is prepared to destroy Zenith to find it. But the Lord of the Vampires has reckoned without the Black Centipede, who rises to the challenge with a few friends of his own: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Amelia Earhart, J. Alfred Prufrock, Resurrection Mary, Doctor Unknown, Gregor Samsa, and the other stalwart members of the Invisible Round Table. Where is the Analytical Engine? Who is the faceless assassin called Anonymoushka? Why does William Randolph Hearst want to fire Percival Doiley? What the heck is going on with Bloody Mary Jane Gallows? How can the Black Centipede possibly save the day? The answers to these and many other questions can be found in Black Centipede Confidential, the second volume in Chuck Miller’s Moriarty, Lord of the Vampires trilogy and the wildest ride yet through the streets of Zenith and beyond. From Pro Se Productions.


THE MASKED MANHUNTER OF THE SKIES RETURNS! Pulp Obscura, an imprint of Pro Se Productions in conjunction with Altus Press, brings yet another rare and classic Pulp Character back to life from Pulp's Golden Era! Kerry Keen is a young millionaire playboy by day to hide his nocturnal adventures as a costumed airborne crime fighter! From a secret underground hangar on his Long Island estate in the Graylands, The Griffon takes to the skies in the Black Bullet, his supercharged and heavily armed seaplane on missions of justice and vengeance! This stunning collection features an incredible cover by Mike Fyles as well as fantastic format and design by Sean Ali! Six Tales of Action, Excitement, Mystery and Amazing Arial Adventure take flight in this collection from writers Van Allen Plexico, Chuck Miller, Phil Bledsoe, S. E. Dogaru, Don Thomas and R. P. Steeves! Climb into the cockpit of the Black Bullet with Kerry Keen and fly off into THE NEW ADVENTURES OF THE GRIFFON from PULP OBSCURA!


A stranger with a glittering hook for a left hand. He came to the untamed wilderness of Africa to escape from a dark, troubled past to make his fortune. Yet his new life comes at an unexpected price. Wherever he goes adventure, danger, and death seems to follow... From Pulp Obscura comes brand new adventures of one of the most unique heroes of Classic Pulp! Armless O'Neil, explorer, adventurer, and soldier of fortune with his own unique view on life and a thirst for action like no other lives once more in the pages of Pulp Obscura, an imprint from Pro Se Productions in conjunction with Altus Press! In the Heart of the Dark Continent, the Man Known as Armless O'Neil Hunts for Legendary Treasures, but Discovers a World of Shadowy Secrets, Wild Danger, and Sensational Adventure! Thrill to Five Fantastic Stories of Savage Mystery, Amazing Action, and Incredible Excitement from Sean Taylor, Nick Ahlhelm, R. P. Steeves, I. A. Watson, and Chuck Miller! Follow Armless O'Neil as he makes his way in bold new stories from the finest in New Pulp today! Pulp Obscura Proudly Presents Blood-Price of the Missionary's Gold: The New Adventures of Armless O'Neil!


Puttin' The Monthly Back into Pulp with Sci-Fi, Mystery, and Good ol' Masked Vigilante Action, PRO SE PRESENT #8 hits the streets, adventure blasting from both barrels! Van Allen Plexico's exclusive epic novella 'Hand Of The Machine', featuring HAWK, his latest creation, concludes ! Kevin Rodgers takes us into the terrifying state of mind...or reality....known as 'Paranoia' and New Pulp's Best New Writer of the Year Chuck Miller shares another tale of his wild and wacky hero, The Black Centipede, starring in 'Funeral for a Fiend!' With mind blowing art work provided by Sean Ali and Rowell Roque, PRO SE PRESENTS #8 is almost too much Pulp to handle!


Punching its way into its second year, PRO SE PRESENTS keeps on Puttin' the Monthly Back Into Pulp! PSP 13 is chock full of old favorites and new faces! Chuck Miller brings a new chapter in the world of his psychedelic Pulp character, The Black Centipede! Noted writer H. David Blalock introduces readers to 'Kelly's Beast'! And Joshua Reynolds returns along St. Cyprian, Pulp's favorite Royal Occultist! Magic, madness, murder, and more! Featuring Cover Design and Art Work from Sean E. Ali, Pro Se Presents 13 comes out blazing from Pro Se Press!


Pro Se Presents 17 Explodes with Three New Tales by Three of the Finest Authors of New Pulp Today! New Pulp Publisher and Author Ron Fortier introduces a brand new heroine in FURY IN VERMONT! The Master of Psychedelic Pulp, Chuck Miller, comes out punchin' with another great tale of the Black Centipede, THE PLAGUE'S THE THING! Pulp Author of the Year Teel James Glenn introduces a new character as Marshal Sovereign Wolf takes on mystery in SNAKE AND WOLF! Find out why Fortier, Miller, and Glenn are the Best and why Pro Se Presents is the New Pulp Magazine to buy! From Pro Se Productions, Puttin' The Monthly Back into Pulp!


“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” So said Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street, more than a century ago. Vionna Valis and Mary Jane Kelly are a pair of hard working psychic detectives experiencing a run of bad luck. A new detective agency, the Femmes Fatales, is taking most of their business. Things seem to change for the better in the form of a new client named Scudder Moran, a wealthy young man with a unique problem; He has been targeted by the very, very late Professor James Moriarty—the Napoleon of Crime in another century, now Lord of the Vampires! Vionna and Mary find themselves in the middle of a case where everything is both improbable and impossible. How will they find their way to the truth? Unexpected help arrives in the ghostly person of the Great Detective himself, and they set about unraveling a tangled web of lies and secrecy that reaches deep into each of their lives. Can they find the light before Moriarty unleashes his final, most horrific scheme? VIONNA AND THE VAMPIRES by Chuck Miller (Creator of The Black Centipede) is the first volume in the “Moriarty, Lord of the Vampires” trilogy.


The pioneer of what has come to be known as Psychedelic Pulp brings his mix of madness and adventure to digital singles. Chuck Miller, the creator of The Black Centipede introduces The Fabulous World of Zenith, a new and original series that will examine the world of the Black Centipede, Vionna Valis, Mary Kelly and Doctor Unknown Junior from a variety of strange and oblique angles. 

The first episode in Miller’s series focusing on the city in which his characters live and die takes a look into The Journal of Blood Mary Jane: My Florida Idyll. For the first time, the Black Centipede's closest friend and most implacable opponent, the mysterious and deadly Mary Jane Gallows, pulls back the shroud on her life in her own words. Thrill to her surreal encounters with Ponce De Leon, Cotton Mather, Professor James Moriarty, Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin, Mary Pickford, H. P. Lovecraft, and many others-- including her father, the diabolical genius known as Jack the Ripper.


Chuck Miller, the master of Psychedelic Pulp, returns with the second episode of the wildest, weirdest Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series yet. The Fabulous World of Zenith, a new and original series that will examine the world of the Black Centipede, Vionna Valis, Mary Kelly and Doctor Unknown Junior from a variety of strange and oblique angles continues on with The Journal of Bloody Mary Jane: My Florida Idyll- Part Two!

Finding herself trapped in the small Florida settlement of Cotton Mather and Ponce De Leon, Mary Jane Gallows continues on her odd mission for the now vampiric Professor Moriarty, as well as her own personal twisted journey. Strange creatures inhabit the dilapidated village surrounding the mysterious Fountain of Youth. Three men stumble their way into the crop of building and strangeness seeking a murderess, not knowing that Bloody Mary Jane is indeed among them. And Miss Gallows finds out much and yet nothing about the future, her destiny, and secrets that could mean her own demise or even better, the end of the world.

The Journal of Bloody Mary Jane: My Florida Idyll- Part Two is the second digital short story entry in Chuck Miller's The Fabulous World of Zenith Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series.


Chuck Miller, the master of Psychedelic Pulp, brings the first arc of the wildest, weirdest Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series yet to a close in a way only he could! The Fabulous World of Zenith, a new and original series that will examine the world of the Black Centipede, Vionna Valis, Mary Kelly and Doctor Unknown Junior from a variety of strange and oblique angles, concludes its first tale with The Journal of Bloody Mary Jane: My Florida Idyll- Part Three!

All the horrible secrets of the tiny settlement in the Everglades erupt like a slashed jugular into the open as Bloody Mary Jane Gallows confronts her murderous actions and rips open the sloppily stitched facade hiding the twisted doings of Cotton Mather and Ponce De Leon! A bath in a corrupted Fountain, imprisoned bloodsuckers desperate to feed, and two men desperate to uncover the secrets of immortality for their own individual perverse reasons. All of this and Bloody Mary Jane finds her purpose in her most unusual life, but not before more die on her way there.

The Journal of Bloody Mary Jane: My Florida Idyll- Part Three is the third digital short story entry in Chuck Miller's The Fabulous World of Zenith Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series.


The year is 1932. The place is Zenith, home of the mysterious Black Centipede. The sinister Professor James Moriarty comes calling, and he's brought a few friends with him: John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Ma Barker, Bonnie and Clyde, the Bell Witch, the Loch Ness Monster, and the rest of the deadly Order of the Sunless Circle. Moriarty is looking for Jack the Ripper's Analytical Engine, and is prepared to destroy Zenith to find it. But the Lord of the Vampires has reckoned without the Black Centipede, who rises to the challenge with a few friends of his own: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Amelia Earhart, J. Alfred Prufrock, Resurrection Mary, Doctor Unknown, Gregor Samsa, and the other stalwart members of the Invisible Round Table. Where is the Analytical Engine? Who is the faceless assassin called Anonymoushka? Why does William Randolph Hearst want to fire Percival Doiley? What the heck is going on with Bloody Mary Jane Gallows? How can the Black Centipede possibly save the day? The answers to these and many other questions can be found in Black Centipede Confidential, the second volume in Chuck Miller’s Moriarty, Lord of the Vampires trilogy and the wildest ride yet through the streets of Zenith and beyond. From Pro Se Productions.


One of Lester Dent's early characters returns in a collection of all new adventures authorized by the legendary creator's estate- The New Adventures of Lynn Lash from Pulp Obscura! 

Lynn Lash was created by Lester Dent, the man responsible for one of pulp fiction's greatest and most enduring adventurers, Doc Savage! 

Lash made his first appearance in 1932 in Ace's Detective Dragnet Magazine. His few stories contained many elements that Dent used when he began writing the adventures of the Man of Bronze. Lash lives and works in a skyscrapers headquarters in the heart of the city. He operates as a special consultant to the police, investigating unusual scientific threats beyond their abilities. Lash has an amazing array of equipment and devices of his own design which he employs in his cases. Occasionally aided by his secretary, Rickey Dean, Lynn Lash uses his formidable intellect and astonishing inventions to defeat the schemes of madmen and win the war on crime! 

From Out of the Past Comes New Tales of One Of the Gadgeteers of the Golden Age! Pro Se Productions in conjunction with Altus Press presents a new volume in its PULP OBSCURA line! Bringing adventures and heroes lost in yesterday blazing to life in New Pulp tales today! 

Six tales featuring Mechanical Marvels and Maddening Mystery from Andrew Salmon, Chuck Miller, Jim Beard, Tim Lasiuta, R. P. Steeves, and Teel James Glenn! Pulp Obscura Proudly Presents THE NEW ADVENTURES OF LYNN LASH!


Eleven years ago, the most lethal terrorist the world has ever seen was apprehended after a four-day rampage that left more than a million dead worldwide. Eight-year-old Jessie Von Cosel, half of the deadly cybernetic entity known as LITTLE PRECIOUS, was tried, convicted and sent to the refurbished detention facility on Alcatraz Island, where she is the only prisoner. The other half of the persona, an unimaginably-advanced robot, was never found. Jessie lapsed into a near-catatonic state until... Today, Jessie Von Cosel has emerged from her decade-long torpor and is showing alarming signs that the Little Precious persona is coming back online. The authorities summon Dana Unknown, better known as Doctor Unknown Junior, and her obstreperous partner, former superhero kid sidekick Jack Christian, to take action-- but it may already be too late. Dana and Jack plunge into a toxic stew of murder, dark secrets, government cover-ups and black magic, with the help of an unlikely band of allies: Vionna Valis; the Black Centipede; a conspiracy-busting journalist named Garrison "Grassy" Knowles; Dana's father, the reclusive Doctor Unknown Senior; and a certain twice-deceased former Napoleon of Crime. Can our heroes unravel the horrific plans of the Cult of the White Centipede in time to prevent THE RETURN OF LITTLE PRECIOUS? Find out in Book Three of Chuck Miller’s MORIARTY, LORD OF THE VAMPIRES Trilogy! From Pro Se Productions.


WHEN THE SHADOW SEES THE SUN is the realization of a concept of a brilliant creative mind that recognized certain things in himself, dark things. Things he thought he might not overcome. He conceived this idea, partly in jest, but more in earnest desire. A book focused on creative souls who experience depression and struggle with horrors that they exorcise by putting them to paper, but just can’t always let go of that way. He wanted there to be a book out there for creatives (and others who might benefit) by creatives to address the struggles so many endure and to offer ways to cope, to deal, and to move on. To overcome. Logan L. Masterson lost his battle with what plagued him on March 29, 2016. And this book, his idea, is now a reality, to help bring to light the issues creative souls do endure, many similar to anyone else, some unique to our own little family. All proceeds from this book will go to a variety of charities, local as well as state and national, to promote suicide intervention and prevention as well as to assist with working through and surviving depression, with a focus being on those who are artists, writers, performers, etc. affected by this. In these pages, authors John G. Hartness, Tim Byrd, Ernest Russell, Phillip Drayer Duncan, Mark Bousquet, Thomas R. Skidmore, Nikki Nelson-Hicks, Andrea Judy, Scott Hancock, Joe Hilliard, Herika R. Raymer, Melinda LaFevers, Alexander S. Brown, Joseph Lamere, Lee Houston Junior, Ethan Nahte, Kristi King-Morgan, Jason Holmes, Lou Mougin, Judy Wall Crump, Mark Steinwachs, Nancy Hansen, Chuck Miller, Aaron Smith, I. A. Watson, Neth Williams, Ellie Raine, Lisa Collins, Tommy B. Smith, H. C. Playa, Sean Taylor, M. B. Weston, JC Crumpton, Gordon Dymowski, J. H. Fleming, Jef Hewitt, and Jim D. Gillentine tear open their souls for you to read. Introduction by Julianna Robinson. Cover by Adam Shaw. And make no mistake. This book is about and because of Logan L. Masterson.


Chuck Miller, the master of Psychedelic Pulp, returns with the fourth episode of the weirdest Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series yet. The Fabulous World of Zenith, an original series that will examine the world of the Black Centipede, Vionna Valis, Mary Kelly and Doctor Unknown Junior from a variety of strange and oblique angles continues on with a tale featuring the Centipede himself! A place where people of all sorts check in, but only evil checks out. Can even the Black Centipede survive room service and the hellish wake up call of the HOMICIDE HOTEL? Newest episode of The Fabulous World of Zenith, a Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series from Chuck Miller.


Chuck Miller, the master of Psychedelic Pulp, returns with the LATEST episode of the wildest, weirdest Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series yet. The Fabulous World of Zenith, an original series that will examine the world of the Black Centipede, Vionna Valis, Mary Kelly and Doctor Unknown Junior from a variety of strange and oblique angles continues on with WHITECHAPEL VIGILANCE COMMITEE: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF A KIND WE'D RATHER NOT THINK ABOUT!

Two of the most unique heroines of all time, returned from death at the hands of Jack The Ripper himself, Vionna and Mary make up the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee and take on threats paranormal, supernatural, and beyond. But can even they survive this time when they have CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF A KIND WE’D RATHER NOT THINK ABOUT? Find out in this fifth tale in The Fabulous World of Zenith, a Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series by Chuck Miller!


READ WHAT FANS, REVIEWERS, AND OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT CHUCK MILLER'S WORK AT PRO SE!  


CREEPING DAWN: THE RISE OF THE BLACK CENTIPEDE REVIEWS


REVIEW ON PULP FICTION REVIEWS

By Ron Fortier

Chuck Miller is emphatically one of the bright new voices in the New Pulp Fiction movement and last year burst on to the scene with this book.  It introduced the world to his truly mondo-bizarro hero, the Black Centipede.

Describing Miller’s twisted, odd and vibrant style is a challenge in itself.  Unlike traditional classic pulp writers, his work is a hodge-podge blend of history and fiction and told from way too many different perspectives.

Written in first person narrative, the Black Centipede is a young man who crosses paths with the infamous Lizzy Borden of Massachusetts and through her encounters a mysterious being calling herself “Bloody” Mary Jane Gallows; the supposed spiritual creation of Borden and Jack the Ripper.  If that wasn’t twisted enough, our hero is saved from being murdered when his own body is possessed by another alien entity representing itself in the shape of an ugly, creeping black centipede.  Once this merger occurs, he finds himself capable of many super human feats of strength.  He becomes, like Will Eisner’s Spirit, virtually impossible to kill.

From that point on his adventures have him crossing paths with real life figures such a gangster Frank Niti and newspaper tycoon, William Randoph Hearst who wants to turn the Centipede into a popular “real life” pulp hero in his own magazine.  Then there are villains like Doctor Almanac, voodoo fighter Baron Samedi who battle across Zenith City, each with his own perverse agenda and little regard for the citizenry caught in the middle.

It’s fanciful stuff indeed but this reviewer wishes Miller would make an attempt at sticking to one point of view.  Towards the end of this first outing, we are given an entire chapter told to us by a police officer who was on the scene.  Supposedly this is necessary because the Black Centipede was on the other side of town when the incident took place. Still paragraph after paragraph of hearsay is as deadly in a novel as it is in a court of law.  Writing rule of thumb, Mr.Miller, show us, don’t tell us.

Still as this is his first book, that one flaw is easily overlooked for the overabundance of originality infused in this book.  With “Creeping Dawn,” Chuck Miller clearly establishes himself as a voice to be reckoned with.  We predict a truly brilliant future for both creator and his one-of-a-kind hero.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars Move over Shakespeare, October 3, 2011

By C. Hahn 

I have read numerous books in my long history and the number of authors I seek out to read again and again can be numbered on both hands. It is time to graft on a new finger because the world of literature has a new shining light.

With a gift of language and a eye for detail Chuck Miller spins a delightful web that draws the reader in and doesn't let them go.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

The odd becomes reality in this pulp character, April 14, 2013

By Darkendale "Raven" 

Enter the Black Centipede, a crime fighter of a decidedly different cut. When the person who will become the Black Centipede is introduced by being involved with the likes of Lizzie Borden, the tale can only grow stranger from that starting point. Then we are introduced to Bloody Mary Jane, a very much alive and deadly thought creation, a tulpa, brought into this world through the minds of Lizze Borden and Jack the Ripper!

The Black Centipede is both in love and in danger with Bloody Mary Jane. She bounces in and out of the story, which presently reads like a Shadow magazine with various gangsters all vying to become boss of the underworld. The Black Centipede is a dark avenger, much like the Shadow, as he has no compulsions against shooting gangsters to death.

But along the way, the Centipede encounters FDR, and is directly responsible for saving the President's life. Action packed beginning to end, this book is a must read for every fan of the modern pulp.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

February 20, 2012

By Doctor Panic

I enjoyed the Black Centipede. I loved the dark side he has, and I think the way the book was written speaks volumes to the author stepping outside the box a little with the writing style. He ties in some famous...or maybe infamous characters into a pulse pounding story that makes you want to turn the page over and over. The book as i said has a dark undertone, but i think what the author came out with was brilliant!

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

"Creeping Dawn" Twists and Turns Like its Multi-Legged Namesake, February 5, 2012

By Don Gates 

Chuck Miller's take on classic pulp vigilante tropes first came to my attention through his blog, where he's been posting bits and pieces of his writing for some time. The Black Centipede isn't the only character Chuck's been working on, but it's the one that grabbed me personally due to my love of Shadow-like pulp heroes and after reading the short stories on the blog I eagerly anticipated the full-length Centipede novel. I was not disappointed with the novel, and was actually very pleasantly surprised: I was familliar with what Miller did that made characters like Centipede and his world unique creations, but wasn't prepared for what the sustained reading-experience of a whole novel would be like.

If you are expecting an untarnished hero with a heart of gold pitted against plainly obvious "eeevil" characters, you may be disappointed. There are no blacks and whites in this book, only shades of gray. It sounds like a cliche, but it's true... it's also true that Miller pulls it off in ways I've never seen a writer do it. For an example, start with the Centipede himself: a wry and sardonic narrator who channels the croaky "voice" (among other traits) of William S. Burroughs into a Spider/Shadow hybrid- a master of skills both martial and esoteric and who seriously enjoys cracking the skulls of criminals. There are quite a few times that the Black Centipede's witty and conversational narrative made me chuckle out loud... it's been a while since a character- especially in a pulp- made me do that. The Black Centipede ultimately comes off as human (even though his skills are often obviously fueled by something more) and it's this humanity- with all the pitfalls and shortcomings that being human includes- that makes him a terrific character.

The Centipede's world is also a unique creation: from the phantasmagorical origin sequence involving Lizzie Borden and eldritch forces to the strange parallels of the JFK assassination that come later in the book, "Creeping Dawn" is a funhouse mirror of figures from our histories both real and imaginary, infamous and legendary. There was quite a few times I thought "Wow, I can't believe he's doing this" in regards to people or events referenced. Many writers squeeze in events from history or fiction into their works, but none of them do it in this particular way... it feels both natural and weird, and by "weird" I mean "weird in a good way" since weirdness is a key element in the story.

And what of the story? Well, it's hard to discuss it too much here without giving away some of the finer plot points, but it involves an eternal dance of death and love between the Black Centipede and his friend/lover/enemy Bloody Mary Jane Gallows, an entity not quite of this earth yet not entirely otherworldly. The story also involves the rise of a mysterious criminal mastermind in the nowhere/everywhere city of Zenith, a man known as Doctor Almanac who echoes (to me, at least) some of the earlier Batman villains. Lastly, much of the story also deals with the public's perception of the Black Centipede himself, as he rises from "masked-nut" to unacknowledged force for good to media-darling and "sanctioned masked-nut". It's these threads, Centipede's place in them, and the movers and shapers behind the threads that make this a fun read.

I can't find too much wrong with the book. Modern pulp books are often fraught with typographic errors within their pages, but this book has almost none that I was able to find. If I had to find any fault with it, it would be with the climax, or rather the series of climaxes in the story: one of these is related to Centipede via one of the supporting character's flashbacks. This technique makes for a bit of an unusual feeling that I'm not used to when it comes to a pulp's boiling-point of action. Then again, this book is a unique experience all around and this just goes to add another special twist to the book's storytelling.

I can't recommend "Creeping Dawn: Rise of the Black Centipede" enough. It may not be for everyone, but if you want to experience a truly unique and one-of-a-kind pulp novel then give it a shot.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

4.0 out of 5 stars 

Interesting new, neopulp character, November 3, 2011

By Michael R. Brown 

This is another original "new pulp" or "neo pulp" character. While set in the 1930s, the author doesn't trying to imitate the style or characteristics of that period. This can be either good or bad, depending on your tastes. do you want something totally in the style, or are you willing to accept a modern work set in that period).

Chuck Miller has for some time been working on his "Black Centipede" character and the world he lives in thru his blog [...]. This then is the first book length appearance of the BC.

Overall, the BC is a mixture of crime/pulp heroics/weird menace. Real characters from the period (HP Lovecraft, Amelia Earhart, Lizzie Borden, and others) are mixed in, along with fictitious characters and places.

All center around the hero of the piece, the Black Centipede. What is interesting, is Chuck works in that the BC has a biographer who writes and publishes highly fictionalized versions of his exploits. So there is in that world a fictional BC and the real one. Also, the occult does play a part in this series, something that was not true for most original pulp heroes.

This work serves as the original and beginnings of the Black Centipede.

I do hope we get further volumes of this character and his world.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Creeping Dawn... The beginning of a New Pulp Legend!, June 4, 2012

By Bittergreen 

This is going to be the most unusual book you'll read for quite a while. If there is one thing Chuck Miller does well, it's turning convention on its ear in the most entertaining way. You're not going to find your hero as clear cut or stalwart as expected, and neither are your villains pure evil incarnate. That would be the expected norm in most pulp stories, but this is something very unique. Against a big swash of noir background, and with a wry sense of humor and acute timing, Chuck Miller gives us his take on the reluctant anti-hero, and the completely incredible but somehow believable world he exists in. It's not just an enjoyable read, it's a romp through history as viewed in a cracked and distorted mirror. Half the fun of devouring this page-turner is seeing what famous or infamous individual is going to show up next. Creeping Dawn is a book you're not going to forget soon, and bits and pieces of this tale are going to stick with you. This reader is very much looking forward to whatever Chuck Miller serves up next, because if his debut novel is any indication; The Black Centipede--as well as his creator--are here to stay for the long haul. You don't want to miss this introductory novel of what is destined to become a New Pulp legend.

REVIEW ON SMASHWORDS

By Voice Spider on April 26, 2013 :    

'Creeping Dawn: The Rise of the Black Centipede' is a book that I both highly enjoyed, and one that also made me want to set it aside and forget about.

The intro to the book is wonderfully done, the way that Miller introduces the Centipede from his fictional roots and then goes into his actual roots was interesting to read. Some elements, such as Lizzie Borden, were both unusual and yet very engaging. It actually had me reaching for Google to refresh my memory. 

The first half, if not first three quarters of this book are well done. Elements flow easily into each other, the action is handled well. Not too detailed yet not too glossed over. There's an element of danger, mystery, and the hunt for Dr. Almanac contained just the right of Pulp villian craziness with over the top characters. (Baron Samedi being one of my favorites) 

The writing is fairly well done, the characters are believeable and the Pulp aspect of the story shines bright. There is a lot here to engage the reader, to drive them on in the story and to keep them interested. Even slow parts in the beginning were still interesting enough to keep me interested in what was going on. 

However, in the last quarter of the book, the story quickly falls apart for me. There is no real climax to the story, no final confrontation between Almanac and Centipede. Instead, you are treated to a second hand telling of how the criminal mastermind was arrested. Not only that, but the telling of that tale is so drawn out, so muddled, so uninteresting, that I really wanted to set the book aside and forget about it. One of the major things I have found with Pulp fiction, is that much like modern day superhero stories, you can't build up to a climactic battle and then not have it. It's like reader's blue balls. Not only that, it takes the climax right out of the book. Your rising action suddenly ends and then...nothing. 

Creeping Dawn could have easily been a four to five star book. I really did enjoy a large, significant portion of it. I will and have recommend it to others to read, especially if you enjoy the Pulp genre. However, the lack of any real climax to the story, even with the surprise 'who done it' ending, really drags this book down for me. I will be buying the sequal to this novel, however, because I really do like the story, I do like the characters, and Miller is a fairly good writer. 

So if you like Pulp, pick this book up. The ending may work for you, it has for others that have rated and reviewed this book. However, it didn't work for me. But still, if you like Pulp, you will probably really enjoy this story.


BLOOD OF THE CENTIPEDE REVIEWS


REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Black Centipede's Back !, April 14, 2013

By Darkendale "Raven" 

I found this volume of the Black Centipede fascinating, with its mixture of the occult and the simply criminal. The Centipede is called to Hollywood to consult on a movie featuring one of his pulp magazines. With him, as a special envoy from President FDR, travels Amelia Erhart, who proves to be handy in a tussle, plus helping the Centipede rein in some of his kill lust. She also has a secret that will be crucial to stopping Jack the Ripper, if only for a time.

But I want to share something I found to be fascinating. The Centipede is dreaming of a court case with twelve jurors. Each person rises and says something unusual. It was awesome to see how Chuck Miller used verbal tapestry to allow one to identify each as a suspect in the unsolved Jack the Ripper case. He names one of them but even without that, what the person says would allow most readers to recognize the individual, although they might NOT have known this person was even a suspect.

The book is a wild roller-coaster ride with some of the usual suspects from the first book, Rise of the Black Centipede, such as Bloody Mary Jane Gallows and Lizzie Borden, along with Baron Samedi and Jack the Ripper. It also introduces a fearsome female who calls herself The Black Centipede Eater, and the very mysterious White Centipede. If you love pulp fiction, you'll love this book!

The part that deals with Jack the Ripper raises yet another genuine suspect, although exactly who or what the Ripper truly is may leave you still wondering by book's end. This is far from a bad thin since there are hints that perhaps the Ripper is still not truly gone. The discovery of just who is the Black Centipede Eater is also worth the read. Then there is the White Centipede, a conglomeration between a real person infamous for madness and drunk with power, and an undisclosed Symbiote from a burial ground. Miller also ties this volume in with other characters of his creation, such as Dr. Unknown, Jr..

Well worth reading, highly enjoyable.

Quoth the Raven...

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

Love this book., February 12, 2013

By Leigh S 

I read this book out loud with my son and we both loved it. I fantastic, and other worldly adventure. I recommend it.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

4.0 out of 5 stars 

2nd novel of this original New Pulp character, November 15, 2012

By Michael R. Brown 

This is another original "new pulp" or "neo pulp" character. While set in the 1930s, the author doesn't trying to imitate the style or characteristics of that period. This can be either good or bad, depending on your tastes. (do you want something totally in the style, or are you willing to accept a modern work set in that period?)

Chuck Miller has for some time been working on his "Black Centipede" character and the world he lives in thru his blog theblackcentipede .blogspot. com. This then is the second book length appearance of the BC. The first one, "Creeping Dawn: Rise of the Black Centipede" served as an origin story for the character, and I recommend you read it before this one. You'll have a better understanding of the character, his origin, and his link to two of the other characters in this story. Some shorter stories have appeared in Pro Se Presents, Pro Se's monthly digest 'zine'.

Overall, the BC is a mixture of crime/pulp heroics/weird menace. Real characters from the period (Hearst & FDR, Amelia Earhart, Fatty Arbuckle, Einstein, Aleister Crowley, and others this time) are mixed in, along with fictitious characters and places.

With this story, set in 1933, after the first one, has the Centipede in Hollywood dealing with a movie based on him called "Blood of the Centipede", written by his pulp biographer and directed by Fatty Arbuckle. While there, he is accompanied by Amelia Earhart at the bequest of FDR, whom the Centipede saved from assassination.

But the Centipede must deal with a new menace: Jack the Ripper, who is helped by the mysterious White Centipede and the Black Centipede Eater. While he defeats the White Centipede, he doesn't learn who/what he is, and hints at the end indicate he will return to plague the Black Centipede and the world in the future. We are also introduced to some new characters in the world of the BC: Doctor Unknown and Doctor Unknown, Junior, Vionna Valis and Mary Jane Kelly, the Blue Candiru (some have appeared in short stories, and am sure they will appear in future stories as well).

As noted, there are 2 BC related short stories that have appeared in Pro Se Presents so far, and a new story being serialized, so should see more stories of the BC and the others. Can't wait.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

4.0 out of 5 stars Gonzo Pulp!!!, October 27, 2012

By Greg Daniel

If Peculiar Oddfellow wasn't already the name of an interesting New Pulp character in his own right, it would be an apt descriptor and tagline for the Black Centipede. For the uninitiated, it is hard to describe the Black Centipede as a character without leaving the reader with slack jaw and raised eyebrow. Chuck Miller has really created a one of a kind hero ... or maybe anti-hero ... heck, by the time Miller is done with the Centipede Saga, he may play two supporting roles and be the villain as well.

For starters, the Black Centipede's adventures are presented in the first person "as told to" Chuck Miller. The Centipede's adventures were also chronicled back in the 1930s in his own pulp magazine by a writer who the Centipede views as an untalented hack. In Blood of the Centipede, said hack is now serving as screenwriter for a "B" movie featuring the Centipede, directed by Fatty Arbuckle and produced by William Randolph Hearst. This combination of multiple chroniclers, fiction within fiction, and a potentially unreliable narrator all lend a meta quality that one does not normally encounter in New Pulp, old Pulp, or any Pulp (except maybe that Tarantino movie).

The other thing that jumps out immediately and grabs the reader by the throat or eyeballs or other vital part is the voice. As I mentioned, it is in first person, which, while not unheard of, is relatively rare in masked vigilante stories. But it is the actual voice that makes it truly unique. It is sardonic, sarcastic, and downright snarky. It is not like any voice in the genre and it delivers a wild, twisting ride that touches on the action, adventure, mystery, and mysticism one comes to New Pulp to experience and delivers it in a manner that is both comforting and disorienting, like a funhouse at an amusement park. That is if that funhouse was designed by Salvador Dali

Miller walks an amazing tightrope in this book and it is testament to his skill and the character of the Black Centipede that I enjoyed it as much as I did, For you see, this story had several elements that, in general I don't like and yet I must admit that not only they worked, but they were necessary to the book. I hate it when a book (or movie or television show) starts in some predicament near the climax and then tells the bulk of the story in flashback. I hate dreams as a plot device. I am tired of Jack the Ripper stories. But here, these things worked.

It is hard to discuss much of the plot for fear of giving too much away. The Black Centipede heads to Hollywood with new partner-in-action, Amelia Earhart, to investigate a mysterious threat while also serving as a consultant to the aforementioned movie. There he discovers a familiar foe (or two) and a new nemesis, the White Centipede. He is helped and hindered by a new costumed vigilante, the Blue Candiru. He discovers a mystical tome of great power, has a run-in with Aleister Crowley, and is introduced to the Order of the Centipede, all while investigating a string of Jack-the-Ripper copycat killings.

But, trust me it isn't as simple as all that.

Blood of the Centipede is a whirling dervish, spinning wildly from childish fun to mystic ecstasy. It is The Shadow by Hunter S. Thompson. It is gonzo pulp. Give it a spin.

Lest I forget, I loved the back cover by Sean Ali. I don't know if it is the Spy vs. Spy vibe or what, but that is one cool piece and should be a poster or t-shirt or both.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

A new spin on the pulp hero, October 18, 2012

By D. G. Lee "Low Zoo" 

Perhaps there's nothing new under the sun, as Ecclesiastes said 6,000 years or so ago, but Chuck Miller's Black Centipede is definitely a breath of fresh air amongst his neo-pulp brethren.

If I had to pick one dimension of the character and writing of Chuck Miller's adventures of of the Black Centipede that makes them sing, I'd be stuck, but I can pick two: first, the whole conceit of having the "real" Centipede telling his stories in old age to Chuck Miller, is a wonderful framing device which pays off. Not that it hasn't been done before -- Harry Flashman's memoirs are "edited" for publication, etc. -- but I don't recall this tactic used in pulp or especially neo-pulp. Whatever the case, it is an intriguing framework/backstory.

Which ties into the other angle I so enjoy about Miller's writing: the Centipede tells his own stories, first person, laying out the "real" story-behind-the-story while his pulp biographer (whom he thinks is a putz) chronicles the fake tales the made it into the Centipede's pulp magazine, back in the day.

Is it hard to imagine Doc Savage pulling this off (possibly one of his aides could), a pulp adventure tell-all that includes historic personages like William Randolph Hearst, Amelia Earhart (who turns out to be more than just another familiar name or pretty face), etc. Not to mention intimations of mortality by the Centipede himself. Will he make it? Sure. Will he make it without getting his ass kicked somewhere along the way? Probably not. Go Centipede!

So instead of the usual slavish imitation of the classic three (Doc Savage, the Shadow, the Avenger) or a pastiche of some character who appeared once in a back issue of NERVOUS TALES in 1934 -- not that there's anything wrong with that! -- with the Black Centipede we are given new wine in old skins, and in a good way.

REVIEW ON AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars 

The Black Centipede Goes to Hollyweird, January 3, 2013

By Don Gates 

In "Blood of the Centipede", Chuck Miller takes us further into the mythos he's created with his many and varied characters, specifically the enigmatic Black Centipede. There really isn't a character (or a series) like this in New Pulp, and Miller has really stirred up an unexpected brew pieced together from his varied influences and his own creativity. To describe the Black Centipede to a first-timer is tricky, but it goes a little something like this: take a pulp vigilante with an occult bent (kind of like a more mystical version of The Shadow), throw him into a Farmerian world of interconnected figures & events both real and fictional, add a wry dollop of William Burroughs, and stir. Then watch the chaos and fun happen. It's a refreshing, heady, and addictive mix, and it's never boring.

"Encouraged" to take a break after the events of the first Black Centipede novel, our hero is saddled with a mysterious "assistant" in the form of Amelia Earhart as he travels to Hollywood to oversee the production of the upcoming Black Centipede B-movie. Once there, things begin to get seriously weird as the 'Pede is stalked by a strange gas-masked creature known as the Black Centipede Eater and her master, the mysterious White Centipede. Also introduced is a new vigilante in the form of the Blue Candiru (I know: "The Blue what?" I said that too... look it up. Ouch). Not everything is as it seems, and the rabbit hole goes deeper than originally thought. Everything leads to a confrontation with a hideous evil force in a battle which answers as many questions as it asks new ones. There's an exciting, creepy, and often surprisingly hilarious good time in this book.

Should new readers read Miller's first Centipede novel, "Creeping Dawn", in order to be able to enjoy this one? I don't think so. However, at times the mix of characters, places, and references in "Blood of the Centipede" get almost too heady. Just when things get too thick, Miller reels us back in a bit so it shouldn't be too overwhelming to new readers. However, reading "Creeping Dawn" first should help untangle some of the strands. That first book is also highly recommended.

Many writers in New Pulp (including myself) could be (and sometimes are) accused of rehashing or retreading old pulp tropes. And there's really nothing wrong with that: pulp cliches are pure fun. Chuck Miller is one of those writers who could not be accused of doing that, however. The intricate tapestry he's weaving for us in his tales are truly unique and are not to be missed.